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We all have friends who spend more time in their virtual worlds, and video games have some pretty interesting soundtracks to keep players coming back. Many songwriters have been quite successful in creating music for video games. Kotaku, the popular gaming site, profiles artists already composing for games, and ASCAP has created a FAQ about how music licensing works when it comes to video games.

The last of our bunch today, Niccolò Piccinni was born in Bari in 1728. He lived a prolific life as a composer in his day, producing operas, symphonies, concertos and chamber music, although today his works are sadly, rarely performed. His operas in particular, of which he composed around eighty, were performed frequently in Rome and abroad in most major European cities.

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Charlotte Yates is an independent New Zealand singer-songwriter with a growing catalogue of seven solo releases and thirteen collaborative projects. She also composes music for TV, theatre and short film, and provides a songwriting coaching service, Songdoctor.

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We all have our unique interests — mine in particular are quite diverse — so I encourage you to make a list of your own favorite multidisciplinary blogs, but to get you started, here are 10 of my favorite blogs, musical and otherwise, that continually inspire my writing process.

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Eventually, the bass line drops down an octave and changes its stubborn pedaling to play chord tones along with the rest of the rhythm section. It starts with the same old D and A. Next, it moves to C♯ and A for the A chord. Then it moves to the B chord but still keeps the pressure on with that non-chord-tone A. Finally, it rounds off with a pleasant, resolute walk-up, bouncing back up between notes of the major scale and A, which is the root of the chord. Classic!

From this basis, I arrived at an elegant system of harmonic possibility that allowed me to compose music in an entirely new tuning system. I discovered rather than created this system, through a Bach-inspired process of “imaginative research,” infused with musical-theological connections in the spirit of Baroque metaphysics. For example, my use of the seventh partial mirrors and supports the subject matter of the Christmas/Nativity-themed text of the piece — according to Andreas Werckmeister, an organist and one of the main Baroque-era theorists of this system:

To add more character to your drums, try panning each piece in your kit in a thoughtful way. This will help keep sounds from getting muddled and will be great for later when you need to differentiate instruments like the kick and bass. This also gives you the opportunity to spice up you drum part with a bit of unpredictability. For example, if your kit includes claps, each hit could switch from falling on the left or right side.

Like the tonality, the tempo here is also slippery. I’m calling it 119, and not 59 BPM. Usually the snare on the 2 and 4 is the king that decides meter in pop and rock, so it’d be 59 BPM. However, the lyrics are delivered so quick that I just gotta go with the more double-time feel. It’s right in the BPM sweet spot where either tempo label works. Last, we have some creative treatments of the choruses. The first chorus is really a half-chorus with an added measure (very cool!), and then it’s a regular chorus when it comes back around. And then when it finally comes back around at the end, you gotta call it “C2” (chorus variation) because of how it’s modified to act as the song’s outro.

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